16 Things To Know About Creating Financial Projections

Financial projections are made up from three financial statements, the balance sheet, the income statement, and the cash flow statement. Here are sixteen things to know about creating financial projections which should give you a better understanding of what’s included in the three financial statements, and how they relate to each other.

16 Things To Know About Creating Financial Projections October 5th, 2016Team
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Pro Forma Financial Statements

The terms pro forma financial statements, financial projections, financial forecasts, and financial budgets are often used interchangeably, but they are not the same thing.

Pro forma financials simply refers to a set of financial statements in the usual format (balance sheet, income statement, and cash flow statement), which have been prepared in order to show the effects of a transaction on the historical financial statements prior to the transaction actually taking place.

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Startup Financial Projections Checklist

The financial projections checklist can be used at any stage, but is particularly useful for startup businesses preparing financial projections for first time. The checklist provides a listing of some of the most common items to check for when reviewing financial projections.

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Enter Opening Debt Payment Term

Debt finance is normally evidenced by a note or document which specifies the amount, interest rate, and date of repayment. The date of repayment will dictate the payment term for the debt, for example a debt might be payable in five years time.

In the previous step the opening balance sheet debt was entered, and in order to allow for this debt to be repaid, an opening debt payment term needs to be entered.

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How to Determine Inventory Days

Inventory or stock as it is sometimes referred to, is the total of raw materials, work in process, and finished goods that a business holds for the purpose of resale.

If the value of the inventory is divided by the value of the average daily cost of sales, then the resulting figure is the average number of days sales which the business is holding. This number is referred to as inventory days, days inventory outstanding, inventory turnover days, or stock days.

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How to Determine Days Payable Outstanding

A business which purchases on account from its suppliers will at any point in time have amounts outstanding to them for unpaid invoices. The amount outstanding is referred to as accounts payable or sometimes as trade creditors.

If the value of the accounts payable is divided by the value of the average daily cost of sales, then the resulting figure is the number of days of payable which are outstanding. This number is sometimes referred to as days payables outstanding, accounts payable days or trade creditor days.

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How to Determine Days Sales Outstanding

A business which sells on account to its customers will at any point in time have amounts outstanding from them for unpaid invoices. The amount outstanding is referred to as accounts receivable or sometimes as trade debtors.

If the value of the accounts receivable is divided by the value of the average daily sale, then the resulting figure is the number of days of sales which are outstanding. This number is sometimes referred to as day sales outstanding, accounts receivable days or trade debtor days.

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Enter Capital Opening Balance

The opening day capital balance forms part of the opening balance sheet of the business. Capital represents cash and cash equivalents introduced by the owners of the business.

The capital opening balance is recorded in the balance sheet of a business under its own heading of capital and together with retained earnings, forms part of the owners equity in the business.

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Enter Debt Opening Balance

The opening day debt balance forms part of the opening balance sheet of the business. Debts are amounts which are owed by the business to providers of debt finance sometimes referred to as lenders.

Debts include many types of finance including loan, borrowings, mortgages, credit cards and generally any form of finance which involves the payment of interest.

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Enter Inventory Opening Balance

The opening day accounts payable balance forms part of the opening balance sheet of the business. Accounts payable are amounts which are owed by the business to its suppliers, they are sometimes referred to as trade creditors.

If a supplier allows a business credit and invoices it for a product or service and payment is made at a later date 30 days 60 days etc, then while the business owes the supplier the money it are classified as an accounts payable in the accounts of the business.

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Enter Accounts Payable Opening Balance

The opening day accounts payable balance forms part of the opening balance sheet of the business. Accounts payable are amounts which are owed by the business to its suppliers, they are sometimes referred to as trade creditors.

If a supplier allows a business credit and invoices it for a product or service and payment is made at a later date 30 days 60 days etc, then while the business owes the supplier the money it are classified as an accounts payable in the accounts of the business.

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Enter Accounts Receivable Opening Balance

The opening day accounts receivable balance forms part of the opening balance sheet of the business. Accounts receivable are amounts which are owed to you by your customers, they are sometimes referred to as trade debtors.

When you allow your customer credit and invoice them for a product or service and receive payment at a later date 30 days 60 days etc, then while they owe you the money they are classified as an accounts receivable.

Enter Accounts Receivable Opening Balance October 5th, 2016Team
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