Retained Earnings Total Assets Ratio

The retained earnings total assets ratio is used to calculate the percentage of total assets funded by the retained earnings of a business. The ratio is an indicator of the extent to which the business is retaining it’s profits and using them to finance assets instead of paying out dividends, and using debt and new capital to fund it’s operations.

 

Retained Earnings Total Assets Ratio Formula

The retained earnings total assets ratio formula calculates the ratio by dividing the retained earnings by the total assets of the business.

Retained earnings total assets ratio = Retained earnings / Assets

Retained Earnings

When a business makes a profit it can either pay those profits out as dividends to equity investors, or it can keep (retain) them within the business. If profits are kept within the business they count as part of it’s equity and can be used to fund the ongoing operations of the business.

Net income and retained earnings
Net income for the year
Dividend Retained earnings

The retained earnings shown on the balance sheet represents the accumulated profits and losses retained by the business since it commenced trading.

Balance sheet retained earnings
Retained earnings Year 1 Retained earnings Year 2 Retained earnings Year 3
Accumulated retained earnings

Both retained earnings and total assets are found on the balance sheet of the business.

How To Calculate the Retained Earnings Total to Assets Ratio

The balance sheet below is used as an example to show how the retained earnings total assets ratio is calculated.

Balance Sheet
Cash 23,000
Accounts receivable 218,000
Inventory 15,000
Current assets 256,000
Long term assets 375,000
Total assets 631,000
Accounts payable 130,000
Other liabilities 65,000
Current liabilities 195,000
Long-term debt 130,000
Total liabilities 325,000
Capital 150,000
Retained earnings 156,000
Total equity 306,000
Total liabilities and equity 631,000

The numbers used in the calculation of the retained earnings total assets ratio are highlighted in the balance sheet shown above. In the above example the retained earnings are 156,000 and the total assets are 631,000.

Using the formula the retained earnings to assets ratio is calculated as follows.

Retained earnings total assets ratio = Retained earnings / Assets
Retained earnings total assets ratio = 156,000 / 631,000 = 24.7%

In this case the ratio shows that 24.7% of the assets used within the business are funded by retained earnings. The balance of the assets (75.3%) must therefore be funded by liabilities and capital injected by investors.

Real Life Retained Earnings Total Assets Ratio Examples

There is no correct value for the retained earnings total assets ratio, generally a high ratio is a good thing. Its level will vary from industry to industry, and therefore it is important when making comparisons, to determine an industry ratio benchmark based on financial statements of businesses similar to your own.

To illustrate the difference in the retained earnings total assets ratio from industry to industry, the following table sets out the calculation of the ratio based on the Apple Inc. and Amazon balance sheets.

Apple:
Retained earnings total assets ratio = Retained earnings / Assets
Retained earnings total assets ratio = 104,256 / 207,000 = 50.4%

Amazon:
Retained earnings total assets ratio = Retained earnings / Assets
Retained earnings total assets ratio = 2,190 / 40,159 = 5.5%

The retained earnings total assets ratio of Apple (50.4%) is significantly higher than Amazon (5.5%), indicating that Apple has significantly more retained earnings that Amazon, and is able to fund it’s operations from internal resources rather than rely on external debt and capital injections.

The results are summarized in the table below.

Retained earnings to total assets ratio comparison
Apple Amazon
Retained earnings 104,256 2,190
Assets 207,000 40,159
RE/TA ratio 50.4% 5.5%

RE/TA = Retained earnings to total assets.

Understanding the Retained Earnings Total Assets Ratio Formula

Using the formula the following observations can be made.

  1. If the retained earnings are equal to zero, then the retained earnings total assets ratio is equal to 0. None of the assets are funded by retained earnings and must therefore all be funded by either liabilities including debt or capital injected by equity holders.
  2. When the retained earnings are equal to the total assets the retained earnings total assets ratio is equal to 1 and the assets are funded entirely by retained earnings.
  3. When the retained earnings total assets ratio is 0.5 or 50%, the assets are 50% funded by retained earnings and 50% funded by liabilities and capital injected by equity holders.

The ratio forms part of the Altman Z Score ratio where it is used as an indicator of the age of a business (older businesses tend to have higher accumulated retained earnings and therefore a higher ratio), and as a measure of leverage, where a high ratio indicates that assets are funded from internal resources rather than from external injected equity capital or debt.

Retained Earnings Total Assets Ratio and the Financial Projections Template

The retained earnings to total assets ratio is not directly shown on the financial projections template, but both the retained earnings and total assets are readily available on the balance sheet of the template, so it is a simply and worthwhile task to calculate the ratio using the formula above.

Most startup businesses have very little retained earnings and may even have accumulated losses in their early years. This situation means that the retained earnings to total assets ratio may be low or even negative in the first few years but should show signs of a gradual improvement as the business becomes profitable and retained earnings increase (assuming dividends are not paid out).

A falling ratio might indicate that the business is unable to generate sufficient profit from its operations or that it is paying too much of those profits out by way of dividends to equity holders.

Retained Earnings Total Assets Ratio May 19th, 2017Team

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